Food From the Creek (Apr 1990)

The first cover showed Dad doing the laundry with my youngest brother Don helping out. (This photo is featured again with more details in 1993) I didn’t mention what was happening as I assumed everyone knew who it was and what they were doing. I did not even bother putting a date on the cover because everyone should know what month it was. By the third edition I was clued in by a variety of friends and advertisers. I wasn’t too sure how long Issues would continue to be supported or if I could learn the computer well enough. I had traded in my UIC for a Community Futures grant for one year. My son’s friends set me up with a computer and some training and I sat staring at the screen figuring out how to make boxes so they looked like ads. Even typing was a new skill to be learned.

We were homesteaders, settling near the Nass Valley. Our family of eleven worked hard just surviving, ‘enjoying the good life.’ Which I heard many times as my parents were glad to leave the United States and buy homesteaders land at $2 an acre in northern BC. They also had to prove they did $500 improvements a year for five years and then the land became theirs. Both Mom and Dad loved taking pictures so I have a wonderful collection of what homesteading was like and now I get a chance to share them with you.

This month’s front cover is brother Billy and myself getting food supplies out of the stainless steel five gallon bucket. The creek kept the food cold till Mom could make dinner. We would walk ten minutes to carry back what was needed along with water for drinking. It was years before Dad built a cold storage room along with a new house to live in. My Dad and Grandad used horses to pull the plough and us kids picked rocks and weeds. Thinking back, it taught us many survival skills that I still use. I’ve always tried to live as naturally as possible. As I got older I realized many people rely on supermarkets, doctors and T.V. for the essentials of life.

ISSUES will offer alternative choices in food, health care and awareness that are available here in our valley. There is no shortcuts in life and especially where our health is concerned. To be healthy, requires a commitment of time, exploring bookstores, for new ideas and trying things to see if they will work, learning to listen to your body and doing all things in moderation.

We have many local practitioners all willing to share time and knowledge. Each with their own special ability in an area that they enjoy. They are listed in a “ Natural Yellow Pages” at the back, give one a call and see if they can help you.

Thank you to everyone who submitted articles. Keep them coming, this magazine is for you. This is your chance to share your knowledge with others. Don’t forget it’s available at your local health food stores every second month. I am looking for a representative in the Kootenays.

Health Care in parts of China means just that. A doctor is given a certain number of people to take care of and as long as they stay healthy he gets his paycheque. If one gets sick it is deducted from his wage. Therefore he spends his time educating his patients on healthy habits. Sounds like we could use a little of that in North America.